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NUTR 330: Community Nutrition (Gimbar): .

Librarian: Jean-Paul Orgeron

How to Use this Guide

The resources listed below are relevant to your work in this course. Once you have identified a bill or regulation, it will be useful to find articles and other pieces of supporting information in order to write an effective letter.

Finding Government Information

Federal Sources:

Use this site to search for current legislation introduced in the House or Senate.

Agencies create regulations (also known as "rules") under the authority of Congress in order to help the U.S. government carry out public policy. This source is for information on the development of Federal regulations issued by the government. You can also find and comment on proposed regulations and related documents.

The mission of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is to enhance and protect the health and well-being of all citizens. This site has a useful Laws and Regulations section, accessible from the homepage.

State Sources:

Search for bills before the New York State Assembly.

Open Legislation is a public web service that provides access to NYS legislative data.

Where to Find Articles

Citation

It is important to include appropriate citation in your paper. The library has a guide that can help you accurately cite your resources. You can locate it on the library homepage by clicking the "Citing Sources" link, or you can click on the link below. 

Background Knowledge

When you begin a research project, it is a good idea to take a moment to reflect on your prior knowledge of the topic area. How much do you already know about this topic? How confident are you in moving forward with this topic? In most cases, you will need to do a bit of research to get some general information on your topic. 

A great way to gather background information is through using reference materials such as Encyclopedias and Dictionaries, especially important if you are unfamiliar with a subject area or unsure from what angle to approach a topic. Background research serves many purposes: 

  • It can provide an authoritative overview 
  • It makes key issues apparent 
  • It provides relevant names, dates, and events to the subject area 
  • It alerts us to keywords and other subject-specific vocabulary 
  • It gives us references and bibliographies for further investigation

‚ÄčThe library has access to encyclopedias and dictionaries in print and online through particular databases. Some great general subject matter reference databases can be found by clicking on the Databases tab, then the "Browse by Discipline" link. You should then see a link for Reference. You can also click on a heading that relates specifically to your topic. You will most likely see a small blue icon with the letters "REF" next to a few of the database titles in the list. These are subject specific reference databases and will also be helpful in your searching. 

Below you will find a list of online Reference databases that may be helpful in your research. This list is not exhaustive, but it is an example of the types of materials available. 

Interlibrary Loan

The ILLiad system enables current SUNY Oneonta students, faculty, and staff to obtain academic and intellectual materials from other libraries. Your ILLiad account will allow you to:

  • -- borrow items from other libraries
  • -- make online requests for periodical articles from other libraries
  • -- review the status of your requests
  • -- check due dates of outstanding loans
  • -- ask for renewals
  • -- and much more.

Help

Librarians are available to help in several ways: 

  • Visit the Reference Desk in Milne Library
  • Call the Reference Desk at 607-436-2722
  • E-mail a question to a librarian and receive a response within 48 hours
  • Request a Research Consultation to meet individually with a librarian